Beyond a Pair of Sticks

It all started when I was in second year high school. There was just a tremendous desire to hold a pair of sticks and learn how to hit the drums properly. When he saw me holding the sticks, my father said, “That instrument is only for guys, and you are a girl.” In other words, I have to act “ladylike.”

I took his piece of advice into consideration. But I also grew up in a school environment where students breathe artistic expression. I wanted it, and so I pursued it.

I enrolled in the University of the Philippines (UP) College of Music Extension Program. My two semesters there went by swiftly. Nearing the end of my third year in high school, some of my batchmates approached me and mentioned that their drummer quit and asked me if would I like to fill in that slot. I thought it was wonderfully cool to give it a shot!

And so on one Christmas vacation, I visited for the first time a music studio called Blueberry. I eventually discovered that musicians from my university would often go to that place to hone their musical skills.

Frequenting the studio meant having the privilege to play with virtuosos in rock n’ roll, blues and jazz. Pards, of course, is the top of that list. This name was a term of endearment we used for the owner, who also became our mentor. He had been playing music since his teenage years, and this had become his profession as well. His life has been a good example of people who stick it out to their passions. He is a man who found the meaning of life through music.

Read the abbreviated article at https://www.wya.net/op-ed/beyond-a-pair-of-sticks/

 

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This article is posted in World Youth Alliance (WYA) on 21 October 2017. It is an abbreviated article from my recently launched book entitled “Crossroads: Musings of a Millennial about the Youth and God”, a book that tackles the crossroads where God and the youth can meet. The book was launched on 23 September 2017 in Ortigas, Philippines.

WYA is committed to building free and just societies through a culture of integral development, solidarity, and mutual respect.

Photo by Pia Lorenzo

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